Christmas tree worms take their common name from their appearance, of course. They are sedentary, as they feed using their crown. Feeding Behavior (Ecology) Christmas tree worms, Spirobranchus giganteus, are polychaete ciliary feeders that feed using their radioles, the hair-like appendages or “feathers” that circle outward from the central spine, to catch phytoplankton floating by in the water. Oh right – maybe with different words? Naturally, the life cycle of the spirobranchus worm begins with the larval stage.

Christmas tree worms, Spirobranchus giganteus, are found on coral reefs in tropical waters worldwide. So if a scary predator happens to come swimming … Christmas tree worms are tube-building polychaete worms.

They are sedentary, as they feed using their crown. There's even a specially modified tentacle that serves to plug the hole and keep it securely sealed. Christmas tree worms anchor their bodies to the coral reefs, burrowing holes in their new home. ID:15283873 Segmentation was an important evolutionary step that allowed greater diversity in organisms' body plans.

Their life cycles are biphasic with two separate well-defined phases (larval and adult). New photos added daily. Jul 24, 2012 - "Christmas tree worm" is the common name for a marine worm that lives on tropical coral reefs around the world. For those who celebrate Christmas, tree decorating comes once a year, but in the world's tropical seas, 'tis always the season! They are abundant with few predators and are therefore not considered an endangered species. These worms usually live on big coral heads inside a tube that will serve as both home and protection. They are abundant with few predators and are therefore not considered an endangered species. The "Christmas tree" shown here are the animal's radioles, which can be up to about 1-1/2 inches across. Their scientific classification tells us lots more about these animals.

These stunning creatures give the seaweed they cling to the appear­ance of an aquatic Christmas tree on which a brand new ornament has been placed. Download this picture of Christmas tree worms for FREE! Christmas tree worms are sedentary tube-building polychaetes from the phylum annelida and exist almost exclusively on large stony brain corals and porites filter-feeding on microplankton. Oh right – maybe with different words? So if a scary predator happens to come swimming by, they can quickly retreat. The Christmas Tree Worm (Spirobranchus giganteus) is a colorful marine worm with beautiful, spiraling plumes that resemble a fir tree. You can find the Christmas tree worm on most tropical reefs. Well, most. Anyway, now is the perfect time to take another look at these remarkable subsurface symbols of seasonal good cheer (nb they are animals not plants). For Christmas Tree Worms, Christmas trees are for life, not just Christmas.

Well, most. The larvae feed on microscopic plankton for a few days until they locate a stony coral head.

The Christmas Tree Worm is its common nickname but in fact this member of the tube-dwelling marine sea worm family is found mostly on coral reefs and is scientifically called Spirobranchus giganteus. Their life cycles are biphasic with two separate well-defined phases (larval and adult). Christmas tree worms are invertebrate animals which need carbon and nitrogen for nourishment (heterotrophic).