Fossil sample suggests that they were found in central and northwestern Argentina. Scientists have identified the fossilized remains of an extinct giant bird that could be the biggest flying bird ever found. Distribution.

If so, was it a flapper like a goose or a soarer like its relatives, the condors? Argentavis is an Avian from late Miocene Argentina and the biggest flying bird ever. With an estimated mass of 70–72 kg and a wingspan of ≈7 m, it was the world's largest known flying bird (1–10), about the size of a Cessna 152 light aircraft. Did it fly? Argentavis magnificens (literally "magnificent Argentine bird") is the largest flying bird ever discovered. Argentavis magnificens inhabited an area of around 500 km2.

Did it fly? This bird, sometimes called the Giant Teratorn, is an extinct species known (as of 2006) from three sites from the late Miocene (6 million years before present) of central and northwestern Argentina, where a good sample of fossils has been obtained. Argentavis magnificens, the giant teratorn, fits this description. With an estimated mass of 70–72 kg and a wingspan of ≈7 m, it was the world's largest known flying bird (1 –10), about the size of a Cessna 152 light aircraft. Argentavis magnificens (literally "magnificent Argentine bird") is the largest flying bird ever discovered.

Argentavis magnificens is a large bird that was discovered in Argentina by avian paleontologists Campbell & Tonni and was given the name Argentavis – a name which means “Argentine bird.” It is believed that these birds occupied the skies over South America during the Late Miocene Period, about 6 million years ago. Argentavis magnificens ("magnificent Argentine bird", or more literally "magnificent silver bird") is one of the largest flying birds ever known, possibly surpassed in wingspan only by the recently discovered Pelagornis sandersi. In addition to the general fascination stimulated by any huge (but safely extinct) carnivore, the fossils of this bird present paleontologists with a number of questions. With an estimated 20-24-foot wingspan, the creature surpassed size estimates based on wing bones from the previous record holder — a long-extinct bird named Argentavis magnificens — and was twice as big as the Royal Albatross, the largest flying bird today. Few prehistoric animals have captured the imaginations of paleontologists so profoundly as has Argentavis magnificens from the upper Miocene (≈6 million years ago) of Argentina with its enormous size and predatory lifestyle. This bird, sometimes called the Giant Teratorn, is an extinct species known (as of 2006) from three sites from the late Miocene (6 million years before present) of central and northwestern Argentina, where a good sample of fossils has been obtained. Researchers believe that they were less aerodynamically suited for predation compared to their closest relatives.

They used north-south direction to avoid being slacked by adverse winds.

Few prehistoric animals have captured the imaginations of paleontologists so profoundly as has Argentavis magnificens from the upper Miocene (≈6 million years ago) of Argentina with its enormous size and predatory lifestyle.

About Argentavis. Argentavis magnificens, the giant teratorn, fits this description. If so, was it a flapper like a goose or a soarer like its relatives, the condors? In addition to the general fascination stimulated by any huge (but safely extinct) carnivore, the fossils of this bird present paleontologists with a number of questions.