CSS Alabama was a screw sloop-of-war built in 1862 for the Confederate States Navy at Birkenhead on the River Mersey opposite Liverpool, England by John Laird Sons and Company. By Michael Graczyk updated 9/11/2012 6:10:20 PM ET 2012-09-11T22:10:20 John McIntosh Kell, Lieutenant, CSS Alabama and CSS Sumter; born in Georgia, 1823; died October 5, 1900, and buried in LaGrange, Georgia. CSS Alabama was a screw sloop-of-war built for the Confederate States Navy at Birkenhead, England, in 1862 by John Laird Sons and Company. For more information on CSS Alabama and the status of her wreck, see: "CSS Alabama". After leaving England in the guise of a merchant ship, she rendezvoused at sea with supply ships, was outfitted as a combatant and placed in commission on 24 August 1862. For additional views of, or relating to, CSS Alabama, see: CSS Alabama-- Views of the Ship; The Hatteras was sunk in 1863 during a battle with a Confederate ship, the CSS Alabama. Today, the wreck of the HATTERAS is largely intact, resting 57 feet underwater in sand and silt. The Wreck of The Portland - … James King , Ordinary Seaman, Master at Arms, CSS Alabama, killed in action, June 19, 1864, off Cherbourg, France., lifted dead aboard USS Kearsarge from CSS Alabama… A conservator observes the cannon in its shipping crate at at the Naval History and Heritage Command laboratory warehouse in … The wreck site is one of few listed on the National Register of Historic Places. CSS Alabama Cannon. CSS Alabama, a 1050-ton screw steam sloop of war, was built at Birkenhead, England, for the Confederate Navy. [3] Alabama served as a successful commerce raider, attacking Union merchant and naval ships over the course of her two-year career, during which she never docked at a Southern port. French Navy Commander Max Guerout later confirmed that the wreck represented Alabama’s remains.
This page features a special selection of views relating to the Confederate Navy cruiser Alabama and provides links to broader pictorial coverage on her. The HATTERAS, an iron-hulled steamship, was lost in a battle with the CSS ALABAMA on Jan. 11, 1863 about 20 miles out of Galveston. USS Hatteras is considered especially important since the is an example of the transition between wooden sailing ships and steam-powered ships. Title: CSS Alabama Cannon Ball and Storage Box Caption: Post-conservation photograph of a cannon ball and storage box recovered from the wreck of CSS Alabama Description: The cannon ball was recovered in its accompanying wooden storage box from the wreck site of the Confederate privateer CSS Alabama off the coast of France. In 1988, the non-profit organization Association CSS Alabama was founded to conduct scientific exploration of the shipwreck. This 32-pound Blakely cannon was recovered from the wreck of the Confederate warship CSS Alabama off the coast of Cherbourg, France, in 1994.
Alabama served as a successful commerce raider, attacking Union merchant and naval ships over the course of her two-year career, during which she never anchored in a Southern port.