Eastern Indigo Snake is a snake from Colubridae family.

Reproduction . Sometimes, these snakes will have a little bit of red coloring in their chin, throat, and cheek areas.

It is the longest snake native to the United States, ranging in size from 60-84 inches (152-213 cm), and is entirely shiny bluish-black color, including the belly. Their scientific name is derived from the Greek word, “ drymos”, which means “forest” and “couperi”, which means “lord”. The project team has released 170 snakes to date.

The Eastern Indigo Snake studbook population is managed as two separate populations to achieve two different goals. The eastern indigo snake (Drymarchon couperi) is a large (up to eight ft. in length, average length six to seven ft.) bluish/black snake found in the extreme southeastern United States. In 2016, the North Carolina Zoo acquired a pair of two-year old eastern indigo snakes.

Endangered Species Act and listed as Threatened in both Georgia and Florida, where the vast majority of remaining populations exist today.

The eastern indigo snake (Drymarchon corais couperi) has the distinction of being the largest snake native to North America.

The goal is to release a total of 300 snakes to improve the chances of establishing a viable population.

Though they occur throughout Florida, eastern indigo snake populations are declining to the point where they are considered rare in many areas.

Eastern indigo snakes are large, black, non-venomous snakes found in the Everglades and other areas in the southeastern United States.

This program utilizes “generic” specimens that lack parental lineage back to the wild (no locality data).

It is a long nonvenomous snake endemic to the southeastern United States.

In the southern parts of the United States, the Eastern Indigo Snake population has taken a hit due to the destruction of the pine leaf ecosystem.

Eastern Indigo Snakes (Drymarchon couperi) are listed as Federally Threatened under the U.S.

These "quick" forests do not support the eastern indigo snake. The chin and sides of the head are usually colored reddish or orange-brown.

Reproduction.

Its range has been severely diminished. Drymarchon couperi reaches sexual maturity at approximately 3 - 4 years of age (Hallam et al.

The eastern indigo snake is the longest snake native to the United States, with males reaching lengths of more than eight feet.

Eastern indigos typically range from 5 to 7 feet long, but can reach lengths greater than 8 feet. Drymarchon couperi reaches sexual maturity at approximately 3 - 4 years of age (Hallam et al. This non-venomous species is federally listed as Threatened, primarily due to habitat loss.

It remains unclear whether or not Florida populations experience similarly high infection rates. Eastern Indigo Snakes (Drymarchon couperi) are federally threatened and endemic to the southeastern coastal plain of the United States. The first is to make recommendations to produce indigos for exhibits and conservation education programs. Indigos are robust and shiny black, with smooth conspicuous scales.

Eastern Indigo Snake with ophidiomycosis – John Jensen. It was first described in 1842 by American zoologist and herpetologist, John Edwards Holbrook. The eastern indigo project started in 2006, and the program was able to start releasing captive-raised indigos in 2010, with 17 adult snakes released into the Conecuh National Forest below Andalusia, bordering Florida. In North Florida, breeding occurs November - April.

Although previous studies have described seasonal variation in D. couperi movement patterns at the northern limit of their range (southern Georgia), such information is currently lacking from peninsular Florida.

Urbanization and agricultural development have destroyed a large percentage of this species' habitat. Where large areas of otherwise suitable habitat remain, the suitability of those areas has often been diminished by declines in gopher tortoise population and their burrows that provide shelter for this snake.

In North Florida, breeding occurs November - April. By the fall of 2017, they were large enough for their first breeding season. 1998). Though they occur throughout Florida, eastern indigo snake populations are declining to the point where they are considered rare in many areas.