The berries of crowberry were once popular with Eskimo Curlews and are referred to even today as curlew berry. The last recorded sighting of an Eskimo curlew in Canada was at Battle Creek, Labrador, in 1932.

The Species at Risk Act (SARA, Section 37) requires the competent minister to prepare recovery strategies for listed extirpated, endangered or threatened species. Clear, melodic call notes Punishing wind, rain, salt spray, and drought create extreme growing conditions on the headlands, but when calm, the …

It has delayed maturation and a relatively low reproductive rate. The Eskimo Curlew is a monogamous, long–lived shorebird. The Eskimo Curlew is a mottled brownish shorebird with long legs and a long, thin, slightly down-curving bill. Following spring migration in April and May, it arrives on its arctic breeding areas in late May and early June. The Eskimo Curlew is a migratory bird covered under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994 and is under the management jurisdiction of the federal government. It can be confused with its close relative, the Whimbrel, but is smaller (the size of a pigeon), has no barring or "stripes" on the under-wing feathers and its central head stripe is not as wide or well-defined.