The 15th Bavarian Infantry Division, which strangely was raised nearly three months after the 16th on 7 Mar 17, comprised Bavarian Infantry Regiments 30, 31 and 32, the numbers 25-29 having already appeared the previous year and, in the case of bIR 24, 1915. 71 line infantry regiments 13-32 and 41-72, 74-79, 81-85, 87-88, 91-96 12 line fusilier regiments 33-40, 73, 80, 86, 90. Units in Italy after July 1944 This page lists the units for each of the German divisions that was in Italy after July 1944. Recruitment. For colonial troops, the colony colours of red for Cameroon, white for East Africa … Feb 19, 2020 - Photos and information about the Guard and Line Infantry regiments of the Imperial German Army from the Napoleonic Period through World War I. The German Soldier in World War I ... "high" numbered infantry regiments of 442 and beyond(231-242, and 15th in Bavaria). Each of the three infantry battalions within the infantry regiment is a miniature regiment. See charts below for comparison of Combat units for a 1914 and 1918 infantry regiment: Changes in Tactics and Organization: German troops in training for the Spring 1918 offensive, note the number of hand grenades in use, and lack of rifles with fixed bayonets. This is a List of Imperial German infantry regiments before and during World War I. The 15th Bavarian Infantry Division, which strangely was raised nearly three months after the 16th on 7 Mar 17, comprised Bavarian Infantry Regiments 30, 31 and 32, the numbers 25-29 having already appeared the previous year and, in the case of bIR 24, 1915. Unlike ours, the German reconnaissance platoon may be mounted on horses, or in some regiments on bicycles or motorcycles. Baden had been a state since the 12th Century and was enlarged and promoted to a Grand Duchy in 1805 as part of Napoleon's reorganisation of Western Germany. IIRC reserve units would have a cursive 'R', so I suspect this one might mean something else, but I don't have the book. Most of these troops went to the In … Infantry regiments of the Prussian Army‎ (1 C, 12 P) Pages in category "Regiments of the German Army in World War I" The following 21 pages are in this category, out of 21 total. This table is for quick reference for identifying units mentioned in books. See charts below for comparison of Combat units for a 1914 and 1918 infantry regiment: Changes in Tactics and Organization: German troops in training for the Spring 1918 offensive, note the number of hand grenades in use, and lack of rifles with fixed bayonets. See more ideas about German army, World war i, Infantry. Yet, the mainstay of the Army Corps remained the massed infantry regiments from throughout the German Empire. Armeekorps establishment The battalion is likewise organized on the principle of tactical self sufficiency. The German infantry regiment has gone even farther than ours in some respects. It consists of a headquarters with communication section, three rifle companies of three platoons each and a machine-gun company containing 12 machine guns on the heavy mount, together with six 81-mm mortars. Imperial German Infanterie Division 1914. See more ideas about German army, World war i, Infantry. The table lists the Infantry Regiments and Field Artillery Battalions and the Engineer Combat Battalion associated with each division. Up to 1915, Infantry, Cavalry, and Artillery units used an underlay colour (Waffenfarbe) to identify Army Korps assignments. 'J' stood for Jager Regiment. This is a List of Imperial German infantry regiments before and during World War I.In peacetime, the Imperial German Army included 217 regiments of infantry (plus the instruction unit, Lehr Infantry Battalion).Some of these regiments had a history stretching back to the 17th Century, while others were only formed as late as October 1912. Their headquarters company contains, like ours, a communication platoon (telephone and radio) and a reconnaissance platoon (mounted platoon). Feb 19, 2020 - Photos and information about the Guard and Line Infantry regiments of the Imperial German Army from the Napoleonic Period through World War I. The colours used were white, red, yellow, blue, and green. Each infantry Regiment possessed three battalions, logically numbered I, II and III - with each battalion formed from four Companies, numbered one to twelve throughout the Regiment. They were light infantry and usually had slight differences to regular infantry units. The former Saxon army had already been incorporated into the army of the North German Confederation at the conclusion of the Austro-Prussian war of 1866 and it’s regiments given the series 100 – 108 and incorporated in the XII.