Common Name: Star of Bethlehem. Star of Bethlehem Facts. Species Most Often Affected: humans. All parts of the Star-of-Bethlehem (Ornithogalum umbellatum L.) are poisonous, especially the bulbs and flowers. Grows in full sun and shade. The 3 sepals and 3 petals (when they're so similar, they're collectively called tepals) form an attractive star, often 3-cornered, bright white on the upper surface, with green lines on the underside.Blooms April–June.

Thousands of new, high … Can be mistaken as wild garlic or wild onion when not flowering. Ingesting two bulbs by an adult caused shortness of breath. Overview Information Star of Bethlehem is a plant. This is a shame, because when growing Star of Bethlehem in the garden, it is an attractive addition in the beginning. The leaves look a lot like wild onions (but no odor), and the flowers are small, white, with 6 petals.

Star-of-Bethlehem is not very prevalent, but is a significant management problem in fields, turfgrass, landscapes, and roadsides that are infested. Parts of the plant are considered poisonous, but are used in some regional cuisines. In some countries children have been poisoned after ingesting the flowers or bulbs. The bulbs contain the highest quantity of these toxins. If consumed by humans, it will cause severe digestive issues, and if touched, it can cause severe skin irritation. 3 More Answers. Primary Poisons: convallatoxin, convalloside. All parts of the plant contain poisonous chemicals, including various diterpenoid alkaloids like methyllycaconitine. If consumed by humans, it will cause severe digestive issues, and if touched, it can cause severe skin irritation. Star-of-Bethlehem (Ornithogalum umbellatum L.) Background Star-of-Bethlehem is an escaped horticultural plant sold as a spring flowering ornamental.

All parts of the Star-of-Bethlehem (Ornithogalum umbellatum L.) are poisonous, especially the bulbs and flowers. How do you care for an orange star plant? Star-of-Bethlehem (Ornithogalum umbellatum) ... Plants (including flowers and bulbs) contain cardiotoxins (poisonous) and should not be eaten by humans or animals. Star-of-Bethlehem is a cool-season perennial of the Lily family. Ornithogalum umbellatum, the garden star-of-Bethlehem, grass lily, nap-at-noon, or eleven-o'clock lady, a species of the genus Ornithogalum, is a perennial bulbous flowering plant in the asparagus family (Asparagaceae). Questions possibly pertaining to Ornithogalum umbellatum: Could Laurentia longiflora be responsible for my fish dying? Star of Bethlehem (Ornithogalum umbellatum) Star of Bethlehem (Figure 1) is an increasingly problematic weed found in areas of the Murrumbidgee catchment including near Henty and Junee.

In some countries children have been poisoned after ingesting the flowers or bulbs. Ingesting two bulbs by an adult caused shortness of breath. Star of Bethlehem (Ornithogalum umbellatum) used to be a pretty bedding plant, but has now gotten into yards and is all but impossible to kill. Even the seeds are toxic with a 1.4% content of alkaloids. This plant has leaves that look similar to crocus leaves, long and thin, with a beautiful star-shaped white flower. Keep reading to learn more orange star plant information. Star of Bethlehem's flowers are in clusters at the tips of stems to 1 foot tall. These images are copyrighted. Poinsettias are also called the “flower of the Holy Night” because their red bracts are said to represent the flaming Star of Bethlehem. See Full Answer.