Those parasitic females may be trying to enhance their own breeding efforts during the time that they cannot breed on their own. Both sexes are similar, although the female is less glossy than the male. For birds in breeding condition, shown by a yellow bill, the base of the lower mandible is bluish or blue-gray in males, and pinkish in females. With wear, the white spots are lost, while the bill and legs turn yellow. The legs are stout and pinkish- or greyish-red. At this time the bill is dark and the legs are brown. (Suthers 1978) Males are heavier than females. The throat feathers of males are long and loose and are used in display while those of females are smaller and more pointed. In autumn, when the plumage is new, birds are glossed black, with a purple and green shine, and the tips of the body feathers have large white spots. Male and Female Asian Glossy Starling (Aplonis panayensis) race 'strigata' Female Western Meadowlark; blackbird family; Vandaveer Ranch; Salida; Colorado; USA Female Western Meadowlark; blackbird family; Vandaveer Ranch; Salida; Colorado; USA https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1 https://www.alamy.com/female-western-meadowlark-blackbird-family-vandaveer-ranch-salida … The Common Starling has a wide variation in plumage. …

During … Juveniles look completely different with a brown plumage, and the normal lifespan of a starling is around 15 years. The oldest recorded wild European Starling in North America was a male and was at least 15 years, 3 months old when he died in Tennessee in 1972.


The female starling looks less glossy and oily than its male counterpart but a key difference to tell the sexes apart is by the colour of their bills; blue for the males and pink for the females. The underparts of adult male common starlings are less spotted than those of adult females at a given time of year. Under wing coverts are very dark or black in adult males and brown or gray in females, but this can vary among individuals.