Butler, University of Florida. Silver Spotted Skipper butterflies (Epargyreus clarus) are found in all 48 mainland states except possibly Utah, Nevada, and Idaho. Figure 1. Silver-spotted Skipper Epargyreus clarus: Genus Epargyreus Subfamily Spread-wing Skippers Family Skippers All Massachusetts Species: View This Species Side-by-Side With Another Species: Click on a thumbnail image to go directly to that image. This butterfly is one of the most common Skippers seen in North America as it has a very large range. Every magician has at least one disappearing act in his or her bag of tricks and so do many insects, including the larvae of … Occurrence Statewide - resident: Abundance : … An adult silver-spotted skipper, Epargyreus clarus (Cramer), feeding at a flower. Silver-spotted Skipper is the common English name given to two species of butterfly: In Europe, the name is applied to Hesperia comma In North America, it is used for Epargyreus clarus It is well-suited to the study of climate change due to its annual reproductive cycle and habitat. With Dr Phil Fenberg, a colleague at Southampton University, Brooks and Dr Self have been examining the lifecycle, size and distribution of the silver-spotted skipper, a butterfly that is most at home in short chalk grassland in the south of England. It visits gardens, fields and the edges of wooded areas. Wing width ranges from 1 3/4 to 2 5/8 inches. The silver-spotted skipper, Epargyreus clarus (Cramer), characterized by a large white spot on the underside of each hind wing, is one of our largest, most widespread and most recognizable skippers. Photograph by J.F. The Silver Spotted Skipper was caught by the Master Prover the day of the proving. Silver spotted skippers are one of most rambunctious pollinators in the garden. When not eating, caterpillars stay hidden…

A young silver spotted skipper larva hides in a rolled leaf margin. Adult Food: The Silver-spotted Skipper almost never visits yellow flowers but favors blue, red, pink, purple, and sometimes white and cream-colored ones. Hosting on legumes, including locust, wisteria, and false indigo, the caterpillars create nests out of a leaf or several leaves. These include everlasting pea, common milkweed, red clover, buttonbush, blazing star, and thistles. Silver-spotted skippers are in the Spreadwing or Dicot skipper subfamily, “dicot” being a nod to the fact that their larval food plants are not grasses (many Spreadwing species favor members of the Pea family, both wild and ornamental).