When they forage, the Waved Albatross follow straight paths to a single site off the coast of Peru, about 1,000 km (620 mi) distant to the east. In fact, it only comes to land to breed. Waved Albatross (t1) (CHr) _____ (A) (15 birds were seen during the FONT pelagic trip from Arica in the El Nino year of 1997.) In all albatross species, both parents incubate the egg in stints that last between one day and three weeks. The Waved Albatross, Phoebastria irrorata - also known as Galapagos Albatross - is the only member of the Diomedeidae family located in the tropics.

In total there are 22 species in the albatross family, of which 17 are Globally Threatened according to BirdLife on behalf of the IUCN Red List. Here's a list of Albatross species. In small-scale Ecuadorian and Peruvian fisheries, Waved Albatross was the most frequent bycatch, caught in demersal and surface longlines and shark driftnets (Mangel 2012). Specific Description: The Waved Albatross is a localized resident of Galapagos, breeding only on Española Island and seen on all our Galapagos cruise. The Waved Albatross is the largest of the breeding birds on the Galapagos Islands. During the non-breeding season, these birds reside primarily in the areas of the Ecuador and Peruvian coasts. The waved albatross (Phoebastria irrorata), also known as Galapagos albatross, is the only member of the family Diomedeidae located in the tropics. In all albatross species, both parents incubate the egg in stints that last between one day and three weeks. It is rarely encountered away from the Galapagos but there are a few extralimital records. The Waved Albatross (Phoebastria irrorata), also known as Galapagos Albatross, [4] is the only member of the Diomedeidae family located in the tropics. The waved albatross, though, makes no nest and even moves its egg around the pair's territory, as much as 50 m (160 ft), sometimes causing it to lose the egg. This species is the only one exclusively tropical. When they forage, the Waved Albatross follow straight paths to a single site off the coast of Peru, about distant to the east. It … The Waved Albatross breeds on Española Island, Galapagos and La Plata Islands off Ecuador. The estimated bycatch rate of 0.11 birds per 1,000 hooks is sufficient to drive significant declines. The Waved Albatross, Phoebastria irrorata - also known as Galapagos Albatross - is the only member of the Diomedeidae family located in the tropics.

When they forage, they follow a straight path to a single site off the coast of Peru, about 1,000 km (620 mi) to the east. The Waved Albatross (Phoebastria irrorata), also known as Galapagos Albatross, is the only member of the Diomedeidae family located in the tropics. The Waved Albatross (Phoebastria irrorata), also known as Galapagos Albatross, is the only member of the Diomedeidae family located in the tropics. When they forage, they follow a straight path to a single site off the coast of Peru, about 1,000 km (620 mi) to the east. Waved Albatross breed from March to … Total population is estimated at c. 50,000 - 70,000 birds, including 12,000 breeding pairs. When they forage, the Waved Albatross follow straight paths to a single site off the coast of Peru, about distant to the east. In fact, the IUCN lists two species as Critically Endangered, the Tristan Albatross and the Waved Albatross. The only island where they can be seen in the Galapagos is Española, where they congregate to mate and nest in flat areas that are found all over the island. The Waved Albatross has traditionally bred only on Isla Española, Galapagos (i.e. It is the only species of albatross found in the tropics. It may approach the coast in areas of Humboldt Current. The Waved Albatross has a number of qualities that make it stand out from the Galapagos sea bird crowd: an exceptional wing span, beautifully animated features, heartwarming life-long courtships, 3 million lifetime frequent flier miles, and … During the non-breeding season, these birds reside primarily in the areas of the Ecuador and Peruvian coasts. Waved Albatross Facts | Galapagos Wildlife Guide One of the world’s most graceful birds is the magnificent waved albatross, which amazingly, can spend years at sea without ever touching land. The waved albatross (Phoebastria irrorata), also known as Galapagos albatross, is the only member of the family Diomedeidae located in the tropics. The first 11 digital photos shown here were taken on Hood Island in July, 2003, with a Canon EOS 10D and an EF 70-200 mm F/2.8 L IS lens.