The Law of 22 Prairial proposed by Georges Couthon in June 1794 and was created to streamline prosecutions. The law ensured that no suspect was allowed a defence counsel or call for witnesses.

It was simply a matter of killing as many as possible. In France: The Jacobin dictatorship …the Convention passed the infamous law of 22 Prairial, year II (June 10, 1794), to streamline revolutionary justice, denying the accused any effective right to self-defense and eliminating all sentences other than acquittal or death. This was the great Terror that …

All political trials were now held at the Revolutionary Tribunal. Every day the accused filled several rows of seats and they were sent off with barely a word; heads fell by the hundreds. It also made trials last three days and they could only end in acquittal or death. For its part the revolutionary tribunal, as if it too wanted to escape its frightful responsibility by taking on an appearance of automatism, interpreted the law of Prairial as a law of mechanical murder. Debate on the Law of 22 Prairial Source: Bertrand Barère de Vieuzac, Mémoires de B. Barère, membre de la constituante, de la Convention, du Comité de Salut public, et de la Chambre des représentants, vol. 2 (Paris: J. Labitte, 1842), 205-6. The Law of 22 Prairial (1794) The Law of 22 Prairial, passed in June 1794 by the Robespierre-dominated Committee of Public Safety, sought to expand the Terror by removing the rights of accused persons: “The Revolutionary Tribunal is instituted to punish the enemies of the people. The insurrection of 1 Prairial Year III was a popular revolt in Paris on 20 May 1795 against the policies of the Thermidorian Convention.It was the last and one of the most remarkable and stubborn popular revolts of the French Revolution. The Law of 22 Prairial, also known as the loi de la Grande Terreur, the law of the Reign of Terror, was enacted on June 10, 1794 (22 Prairial of the Year II under the French Revolutionary Calendar). It was proposed by Georges Auguste Couthon and lent support by Robespierre. Excerpted in Liberty, Equality, Fraternity: Exploring the French Revolution, Jack R. Censer and Lynn Hunt, eds. After their defeat in Prairial, the sans-culottes ceased to play any effective part until the next round of revolutions in the early nineteenth century.